Windows validating parser software sax

25-Jun-2016 01:53

Give them a corrupted file and you'll get an error message.

XML applications are just the same: they contain a parser which reads XML and identifies the function of each the pieces of the document, and it then makes that information available in memory to the rest of the program. As the component parts of the program are identified, a validating parser can compare them with the pattern laid down by the DTD or Schema, to check that they conform.

This takes considerable time and space for large documents (memory allocation and data-structure construction take time).

The compensating advantage, of course, is that once loaded any part of the document can be accessed in any order.

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windows validating parser software sax-14

Many tasks, such as indexing, conversion to other formats, very simple formatting, and the like, can be done that way.

A SAX parser only needs to report each parsing event as it happens, and normally discards almost all of that information once reported (it does, however, keep some things, for example a list of all elements that have not been closed yet, in order to catch later errors such as end-tags in the wrong order).

Thus, the minimum memory required for a SAX parser is proportional to the maximum depth of the XML file (i.e., of the XML tree) and the maximum data involved in a single XML event (such as the name and attributes of a single start-tag, or the content of a processing instruction, etc.). A DOM parser, in contrast, has to build a tree representation of the entire document in memory to begin with, thus using memory that increases with the entire document length.

As well as built-in parsers, there are also stand-alone parser-validators (see Bill Rayer’s tip), which read an XML file and tell you if they find an error (like missing angle-brackets or quotes, or misplaced markup).

This is essential for testing files in isolation before doing something else with them, especially if they have been created by hand without an XML editor, or by an API which may be too deeply embedded elsewhere to allow easy testing.

Many tasks, such as indexing, conversion to other formats, very simple formatting, and the like, can be done that way.

A SAX parser only needs to report each parsing event as it happens, and normally discards almost all of that information once reported (it does, however, keep some things, for example a list of all elements that have not been closed yet, in order to catch later errors such as end-tags in the wrong order).

Thus, the minimum memory required for a SAX parser is proportional to the maximum depth of the XML file (i.e., of the XML tree) and the maximum data involved in a single XML event (such as the name and attributes of a single start-tag, or the content of a processing instruction, etc.). A DOM parser, in contrast, has to build a tree representation of the entire document in memory to begin with, thus using memory that increases with the entire document length.

As well as built-in parsers, there are also stand-alone parser-validators (see Bill Rayer’s tip), which read an XML file and tell you if they find an error (like missing angle-brackets or quotes, or misplaced markup).

This is essential for testing files in isolation before doing something else with them, especially if they have been created by hand without an XML editor, or by an API which may be too deeply embedded elsewhere to allow easy testing.

Provides a standard way to seamlessly integrate any XML-compliant parser with a Java application.