Updating old furniture be still here

26-Mar-2016 02:59

Before I start, though, I should probably warn old furniture lovers to leave until this post is over.

I don’t really have any qualms about painting old, beat-up furniture, and so the pictures here may be slightly horrifying to you. The first order of business is, of course, sanding.

Don’t be tempted to skip this step…proper sanding will ensure an even, smooth finish that is not prone to chipping.

It takes a LOT of sanding to remove old paint and stain, and I would get very weary of sanding if I had to do it manually.I get tired of sanding even with the orbital sander!I usually start out using 80 or 100 grit sandpaper, especially if there’s a durable lacquer finish on the piece.A lot of people have old furniture pieces that they either don’t like anymore or that doesn’t match with the rest of the décor.But just because a piece of furniture is old and maybe a little broken, this doesn’t mean you have to just throw it away.

It takes a LOT of sanding to remove old paint and stain, and I would get very weary of sanding if I had to do it manually.

I get tired of sanding even with the orbital sander!

I usually start out using 80 or 100 grit sandpaper, especially if there’s a durable lacquer finish on the piece.

A lot of people have old furniture pieces that they either don’t like anymore or that doesn’t match with the rest of the décor.

But just because a piece of furniture is old and maybe a little broken, this doesn’t mean you have to just throw it away.

I think this trend actually started with Ballards Designs (at least to me) when I picked up their catalog and began seeing black furniture, a light bulb went off. You’ve seen countless demonstrations of painting furniture black on the web, but here’s mine….again.