Updating bios in linux

21-May-2017 18:26

First we need to make a bootable CD image, and then burn it.file that I downloaded from the manufacturer web site is supposed to be Operating System independent!When you turn on the computer, the BIOS starts up and perform a Power-On Self Test (POST).The BIOS will check all devices connected to your computer such as the CPU, RAM, the video card, the sound card and so on.Once the post test has completed, the BIOS will looks for Linux operating systems on the hard drive.At this point, the Linux takes over control of your computer and finishes starting up system in GUI or text based mode.Suddenly, you need to update the BIOS on your motherboard to support some new piece of hardware, but typically the motherboard vendor is offering only DOS based BIOS flash utilities. So, all you need is a bootable floppy disk image with Free DOS kernel on it.We are fortunate that guys at FDOS site have prepared one suitable for us.

In other words: If the mount went without errors, copy BIOS flash utility and new BIOS image to the mounted floppy disk image.) and doesn't work for all systems, but this was something else.I suppose I'm lucky in that for more than 10 years my primary work environment has been Linux-based, yet all too often I've been forced to dig out a DOS or Windows image because I need to patch some BIOS device firmware.These days I don't own anything that has a valid Windows license, and even my 2008 white Mac Book has spent most of its life running either Ubuntu or Fedora.Luckily most hardware manufacturers have started to provide bootable images for patching system firmware, and for enterprise-grade hardware they even provide Linux-ready tools.

In other words: If the mount went without errors, copy BIOS flash utility and new BIOS image to the mounted floppy disk image.

) and doesn't work for all systems, but this was something else.

I suppose I'm lucky in that for more than 10 years my primary work environment has been Linux-based, yet all too often I've been forced to dig out a DOS or Windows image because I need to patch some BIOS device firmware.

These days I don't own anything that has a valid Windows license, and even my 2008 white Mac Book has spent most of its life running either Ubuntu or Fedora.

Luckily most hardware manufacturers have started to provide bootable images for patching system firmware, and for enterprise-grade hardware they even provide Linux-ready tools.

Well, there is a utility they support for updating your MSI motherboard BIOS from the Linux desktop!