Thermoluminescence dating sediments

13-Apr-2016 10:08

It uses various methods to stimulate and measure luminescence.

It includes techniques such as optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL), and thermoluminescence dating (TL).

Luminescence dating (including thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence) is a type of dating methodology that measures the amount of light emitted from energy stored in certain rock types and derived soils to obtain an absolute date for a specific event that occurred in the past.

The method is a direct dating technique, meaning that the amount of energy emitted is a direct result of the event being measured.

For several years attempts have been made to establish reliable procedures for thermoluminescence (TL) dating of sediments older than ≈100 ka.

Disagreement persists among TL workers about which procedures are reliable for which sediments.

Single-grain (or micro-TL) studies of feldspar (and quartz) TL.

both spectral emission and glow curve measurements, are recommended as aids to further understanding of current TL sediment dating practices.

It is useful to geologists and archaeologists who want to know when such an event occurred.A brief survey of these results obtained for various sediment types is included so as to demonstrate the range and promise of the TL method for dating Quaternary sediments.Finally, future areas of research and as yet, unresolved problems are discussed.*Prices in US$ apply to orders placed in the Americas only.Prices in GBP apply to orders placed in Great Britain only.

It is useful to geologists and archaeologists who want to know when such an event occurred.

A brief survey of these results obtained for various sediment types is included so as to demonstrate the range and promise of the TL method for dating Quaternary sediments.

Finally, future areas of research and as yet, unresolved problems are discussed.

*Prices in US$ apply to orders placed in the Americas only.

Prices in GBP apply to orders placed in Great Britain only.

Two recent reports have demonstrated that TL ages up to ≈800 ka for polymineral, fine-silt loess and up to ≈600 ka for quartz from beach-dune sands agree well with expected ages.