Spike jonze karen o dating

26-Apr-2016 23:37

Music fans are bigamists — we are married to many records, and we constantly feel compelled to hand out flowers and boxes of chocolates to our own collections. Weezer’s “Blue Album” is like a fetus compared with your wrinkly carcass.

An old record can act as a reminder of a version of yourself that no longer exists; a new record by a band you liked when you were younger serves as proof that your old self is very far removed from your current self, and that the resulting gulf may in fact be too wide to ever cross. If you are old like me — I mean older than 25, but not quite as old as 45 — you will associate Interpol with the wave of hip, young, turn-of-the-millennium postpunk bands from New York City, a class that also includes the Strokes, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and TV on the Radio.

And last season, they put on a play at Lincoln Center starring Elle Fanning. A one-night-only gallery show of previously unseen photographs by Spike Jonze — photographs of skaters Mark Gonzales and Ed Templeton, of Karen O and Kim Gordon and Thurtson Moore, of Chloë Sevigny, Kurt Cobain, the Beastie Boys, and Björk.

It was an encyclopedic, immersive, and hella fun celebration of Spike's and Opening Ceremony's worlds; a personal tribute by Carol and Humberto to their friend and, in Carol's words, "an homage to the medium of film.""It began as a private conversation between Humberto and Spike," Lim explained.

The singer has been making waves as a soloist, earning an Oscar nomination for “The Moon Song” from Spike Jonze’s “Her.” Karen O joins The Virgins, Cerebral Ballzy, Albert Hammond Jr., C O L O R and Har Mar Superstar on Casablancas’ Cult Records.

The songs were written around the time when she was 27 years old (around the period of 2006-2007) and, in her words, is “the soundtrack to what was an ever continuing love crusade.” Karen O’s most recent album with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, “Mosquito,” was released last year.

An old record can act as a reminder of a version of yourself that no longer exists; a new record by a band you liked when you were younger serves as proof that your old self is very far removed from your current self, and that the resulting gulf may in fact be too wide to ever cross. If you are old like me — I mean older than 25, but not quite as old as 45 — you will associate Interpol with the wave of hip, young, turn-of-the-millennium postpunk bands from New York City, a class that also includes the Strokes, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and TV on the Radio.

And last season, they put on a play at Lincoln Center starring Elle Fanning. A one-night-only gallery show of previously unseen photographs by Spike Jonze — photographs of skaters Mark Gonzales and Ed Templeton, of Karen O and Kim Gordon and Thurtson Moore, of Chloë Sevigny, Kurt Cobain, the Beastie Boys, and Björk.

It was an encyclopedic, immersive, and hella fun celebration of Spike's and Opening Ceremony's worlds; a personal tribute by Carol and Humberto to their friend and, in Carol's words, "an homage to the medium of film.""It began as a private conversation between Humberto and Spike," Lim explained.

The singer has been making waves as a soloist, earning an Oscar nomination for “The Moon Song” from Spike Jonze’s “Her.” Karen O joins The Virgins, Cerebral Ballzy, Albert Hammond Jr., C O L O R and Har Mar Superstar on Casablancas’ Cult Records.

The songs were written around the time when she was 27 years old (around the period of 2006-2007) and, in her words, is “the soundtrack to what was an ever continuing love crusade.” Karen O’s most recent album with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, “Mosquito,” was released last year.

The exact number of years doesn’t matter — it just needs to be an integer that can be cleanly divided by five, marking the anniversary of a release date.