Science 11c3 rules for relative dating

24-Mar-2016 22:10

Relative dating is used to arrange geological events, and the rocks they leave behind, in a sequence.

The method of reading the order is called stratigraphy (layers of rock are called strata).

Some fossils, called index fossils, are particularly useful in correlating rocks.

For a fossil to be a good index fossil, it needs to have lived during one specific time period, be easy to identify and have been abundant and found in many places. If you find ammonites in a rock in the South Island and also in a rock in the North Island, you can say that both rocks are Mesozoic.

Long before geologists tried to quantify the age of the Earth they developed techniques to determine which geologic events preceded another, what are termed "relative age” relationships.

These techniques were first articulated by Nicolas Steno, a Dane living in the Medici court of Italy in the 17th C.

Your goal is to study the smooth, parallel layers of rock to learn how the land built up over geologic time.

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Particular isotopes are suitable for different applications due to the type of atoms present in the mineral or other material and its approximate age.

We'll even visit the Grand Canyon to solve the mystery of the Great Unconformity!

Imagine that you're a geologist, studying the amazing rock formations of the Grand Canyon.

Relative dating does not provide actual numerical dates for the rocks.

Fossils are important for working out the relative ages of sedimentary rocks.

Particular isotopes are suitable for different applications due to the type of atoms present in the mineral or other material and its approximate age.

We'll even visit the Grand Canyon to solve the mystery of the Great Unconformity!

Imagine that you're a geologist, studying the amazing rock formations of the Grand Canyon.

Relative dating does not provide actual numerical dates for the rocks.

Fossils are important for working out the relative ages of sedimentary rocks.

Throughout the history of life, different organisms have appeared, flourished and become extinct.