Internet dating in families

03-Feb-2016 12:35

The question nagged at me—not least because of my own experiences watching promising relationships peter out over text message—so I set out on a mission.

I read dozens of studies about love, how people connect and why they do or don’t stay together.

I met a guy online (a long-distance situation) and we’ve been in contact almost daily for a year and a half now.

We’ve gotten to know each other and it turns out that we’re on the same wavelength and get along so well.

In the past I had asked him if he had a girlfriend because I didn’t want to get in the middle of anything (we have “intimate” moments), and he said no and that he used to but that he wasn’t happy.

But just recently, he messaged me that he had finally broken up with his girlfriend! Initially I felt hurt that he lied, but approaching the situation calmly, it’s difficult not to comfort him, I mean we ARE friends and we do feel a little more than what friendship feels like.

You believe in love and romance, but you haven’t met the man of your dream yet ...

Your heart is looking forward to a new exciting relationship and you think of getting married a man from Western Europe ...

This is because we want that instant gratification.Whether it’s where I’m eating, where I’m traveling or, God forbid, something I’m buying, like a lot of people in my generation—those in their 20s and 30s—I feel compelled to do a ton of research to make sure I’m getting every option and then making the best choice.If this mentality pervades our decision­making in so many realms, is it also affecting how we choose a romantic partner?I have a theory on why it’s so hard to find love online. But, when we go out on an actual date, we are disappointed because we don’t get the same emotional sensation that we get when we watch a movie. You have to sell yourself so that others want to go out with you and see what you’re all about. Online dating is hard because we are “browsing” profiles, making judgments based only on a photo. By then, the pool of quality partners has shrunk, and they are left with mostly “undesirables.”Don’t misunderstand me, I’m not saying it’s only women who are the problem. Television and movies have brainwashed us to want and expect one thing. Many profiles have the same types of photos and say the same thing, i.e. I love to travel…” It takes skill to write a compelling dating profile.

This is because we want that instant gratification.Whether it’s where I’m eating, where I’m traveling or, God forbid, something I’m buying, like a lot of people in my generation—those in their 20s and 30s—I feel compelled to do a ton of research to make sure I’m getting every option and then making the best choice.If this mentality pervades our decision­making in so many realms, is it also affecting how we choose a romantic partner?I have a theory on why it’s so hard to find love online. But, when we go out on an actual date, we are disappointed because we don’t get the same emotional sensation that we get when we watch a movie. You have to sell yourself so that others want to go out with you and see what you’re all about. Online dating is hard because we are “browsing” profiles, making judgments based only on a photo. By then, the pool of quality partners has shrunk, and they are left with mostly “undesirables.”Don’t misunderstand me, I’m not saying it’s only women who are the problem. Television and movies have brainwashed us to want and expect one thing. Many profiles have the same types of photos and say the same thing, i.e. I love to travel…” It takes skill to write a compelling dating profile. It created this false sense of expectations and a sense of entitlement that isn’t realistic in real life. Big,” but only realize that he doesn’t exist when they are in their late 30’s or 40’s. Your dating profile has to pop and stand out from the rest of the crowd.