Ddclient not auto updating

18-Jun-2017 02:31

If you need specific help with your account, feel free to contact our Support Team. For some reason I am not getting my IP address updated at dyndns from my ddclient program.More importantly, it opens the door for a whole new breed of cool Internet applications. A Linux service is an application (or set of applications) that runs in the background waiting to be used, or carrying out essential tasks.The following is the format of the DDClient configuration:use=web, web=dynamicdns.park-your-domain.com/getipprotocol=namecheap server=dynamicdns.login=yourdomain.compassword=your dynamic dns passwordyourhost Here is the example of its usage.

ddclient not auto updating-87

Went in a did a edit on the /etc/so that it matched the file in etc/ddclinet/and now I am not getting the warning, now will wait and see if it will do its auto updating like it is suspose to....thanks again Same type of issues when I run sudo ddclient -daemon=0 -verbose, here is the output.

My Linksys router had two DDNS update applications running.

My zoneedit account was updated using the DD-WRT’s DDNS feature. Currently, my ASUS router allows only one DNS provider and one host, which does not work for me.

Here you will find either a set of files named rc.0, rc.1, rc.2, rc.3, rc.4, rc.5, and rc.6, or a set of directories named rc0.d, rc1.d, rc2.d, rc3.d, rc4.d, rc5.d, and rc6.d. The system uses these files (and/or directories) to control the services to be started.

If you look in the file /etc/inittab you will see something like: The boot process uses these parameters to identify the default runlevel and the files that will be used by that runlevel.

Went in a did a edit on the /etc/so that it matched the file in etc/ddclinet/and now I am not getting the warning, now will wait and see if it will do its auto updating like it is suspose to....thanks again Same type of issues when I run sudo ddclient -daemon=0 -verbose, here is the output.My Linksys router had two DDNS update applications running.My zoneedit account was updated using the DD-WRT’s DDNS feature. Currently, my ASUS router allows only one DNS provider and one host, which does not work for me.Here you will find either a set of files named rc.0, rc.1, rc.2, rc.3, rc.4, rc.5, and rc.6, or a set of directories named rc0.d, rc1.d, rc2.d, rc3.d, rc4.d, rc5.d, and rc6.d. The system uses these files (and/or directories) to control the services to be started.If you look in the file /etc/inittab you will see something like: The boot process uses these parameters to identify the default runlevel and the files that will be used by that runlevel.Slackware's init setup is similar to BSD systems, though Slackware does have runlevels and has had System V compatibility since Slackware 7.