Dating violence definition and statistics

27-Aug-2016 09:03

Statistics show that 72% of students in 8th and 9th grades are in dating relationships.Teens use abuse to manipulate and control the other person in the relationship through behaviors ranging from intimidation to severe physical and sexual abuse.Teen dating violence is defined as “a pattern of abuse or threat of abuse against teenaged dating partners, occurring in different forms, including verbal, emotional, physical, sexual and digital.”Relationship violence among teenagers is increasingly common, with some researchers reporting that one in ten high school students has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend.This abuse begins early, often before the age of eighteen or in early adulthood, as more than half of women (69.5%) and men (53.6%) who have been physically or sexually abused, or stalked by a dating partner, first experienced abuse between the ages of 11-24.Teen Dating Violence This web page from the CDC includes an overview of teen dating violence definitions, the consequences of and reasons for dating violence, and a list of additional resources. Teen Dating Violence among LGBTQ Youth This Human Rights Campaign overview of teen dating violence among LGBTQ youth also includes a list of national resources that serve LGBTQ survivors of intimate partner violence.Understanding Teen Dating Violence (PDF) This concise fact sheet developed by the CDC helps explain: Why is dating violence a public health problem? Dating Violence Prevention, Teens Ages 13 to 19 Years The New York State Department of Health provides an overview and links to state and national resources.The following percentages of dating teens reported experiencing forms of abuse: An NIJ-funded longitudinal study of 1,162 students in the Midwest examined the prevalence of several kinds of abuse that male and female middle and high school students experienced and perpetrated in teen dating relationships. About one-third of girls and boys (35 percent and 36 percent, respectively) reported experiencing physical violence in a teen dating relationship. Verbal emotional abuse was the most common form of abuse in teen dating relationships for both girls and boys: 73 percent of girls and 66 percent of boys reported experiencing at least one instance of verbal abuse in a dating relationship in high school.

Preventing teen dating violence starts with awareness. Or that out of every three young people, one has been a victim of physical, sexual, emotional, or verbal abuse from someone they are dating?

Phone interviews were conducted with 1,525 Latino teens, ranging in age from 12 to 18, most of whom (76.1 percent) were born in the United States.

Respondents reported experiencing the following within the past year: [1][4] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Teen dating violence is a serious problem affecting adolescents across the nation, and it is an issue that often goes overlooked or unrecognized.

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness month, and we’re joining the cause to get the word out about what teenagers, parents, teachers, and community members can do to be aware of and prevent teen dating violence.

Preventing teen dating violence starts with awareness. Or that out of every three young people, one has been a victim of physical, sexual, emotional, or verbal abuse from someone they are dating?

Phone interviews were conducted with 1,525 Latino teens, ranging in age from 12 to 18, most of whom (76.1 percent) were born in the United States.

Respondents reported experiencing the following within the past year: [1][4] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Teen dating violence is a serious problem affecting adolescents across the nation, and it is an issue that often goes overlooked or unrecognized.

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness month, and we’re joining the cause to get the word out about what teenagers, parents, teachers, and community members can do to be aware of and prevent teen dating violence.

Surveillance Summaries: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance — United States, 2013 (pdf, 172 pages).