Dating martin ukes

08-Jul-2016 23:24

The only bit of decoration is the simple ring around the sound hole. A Style 0 ukulele in top condition might be worth around 0.Martin Style 1 Style 1’s are very similar to style 0. and serial numbers were added, beginning with #8000.First, they stamped the logo on the back of the peghead (from circa 1895).More knowledgeable sellers will indicate which style the Martin is.However, less well informed sellers, such as on e Bay or in junk shops, will often not know what style the uke is. Whether the new ones match up to the quality of the old ones is an area of dispute.Martin started producing ukuleles in 1916 and were the largest producer of ukes There are a number of different styles (from style 0 to style 5 – but there’s no 4).

To begin with they started by releasing new models. These ukuleles are identical to the standard Martin ukuleles apart from the maker stamps and decals.Ukuleles were in highest production from 1916 to the 1930's, though still manufactured in quantity until 1965.Production quantities during some periods were as great as Martin guitars.Since serial numbers weren't introduced until 1898, approximate dating of the earlier guitars can be accomplished by knowing when Martin made changes to their labels or to the brand, which can be found stamped into the back of the head, the upper part of the back, and just inside the soundhole on the long strut which reinforces the back joint. Ukuleles didn't have serial numbers, but Craig Thompson wrote, "I recently talked to the ukulele expert, Mike, at Gryphon Stringed Instruments in Palo Alto.The very earliest Martins, around 1833, had a paper label "Martin & Coupa". One good way of dating old Martin ukuleles is the headstock.

To begin with they started by releasing new models. These ukuleles are identical to the standard Martin ukuleles apart from the maker stamps and decals.

Ukuleles were in highest production from 1916 to the 1930's, though still manufactured in quantity until 1965.

Production quantities during some periods were as great as Martin guitars.

Since serial numbers weren't introduced until 1898, approximate dating of the earlier guitars can be accomplished by knowing when Martin made changes to their labels or to the brand, which can be found stamped into the back of the head, the upper part of the back, and just inside the soundhole on the long strut which reinforces the back joint. Ukuleles didn't have serial numbers, but Craig Thompson wrote, "I recently talked to the ukulele expert, Mike, at Gryphon Stringed Instruments in Palo Alto.

The very earliest Martins, around 1833, had a paper label "Martin & Coupa". One good way of dating old Martin ukuleles is the headstock.

Some of these turn up and vary from the standard instruments, but they are usually very nice and are frequently signed by the maker.