Dating antique furniture handles

02-Mar-2017 03:17

Drawers (and backs) are also usually one of the cheapest components in furniture. Most modern pieces—even high-quality reproductions that look very genuine on the outside—use plywood in drawer construction.Hunting for antique American furniture is a popular pastime, but how do you really know what you're buying is a true classic, such as a Shaker or Chippendale piece?Also check to see if the hardware has been replaced: usually there will be marks or holes on the wood around the hardware.Note whether the drawer has dovetails, and whether they are machine-cut dovetails or hand-cut. This is usually a sign that the piece is indeed antique—and high-quality at that, since rear dovetails are very uncommon even in antiques.By examining the shape and condition of the furniture nails and screws as well as the wood and finish, you can get a fairly good idea of when the furniture was built, and possibly by whom.The video above provides a great introduction to dating antique furniture and what areas should be examined.Take note of the shape of the screws used to hold the furniture together.Are they tapered and pointed with smooth grooves, or are the ends cut and the slots offset?

Nuts are more common for antiques, while screws are a newer convention.If you are at an office or shared network, you can ask the network administrator to run a scan across the network looking for misconfigured or infected devices.This is a common enough question, but basically there is a standard set of elements to consider when determining whether or not your furniture is antique.Many people make the mistake of looking at one or two details while neglecting the rest, but judging antique furniture is a lot like judging a painting: look at the details, but also take in an overall perspective.For starters, look closely at the hardware—pulls, knobs, hinges, screws, nails, whatever. Keep in mind that hardware goes in and out of style just like everything else, so a large majority of antique furniture has had its hardware replaced at least once.

Nuts are more common for antiques, while screws are a newer convention.

If you are at an office or shared network, you can ask the network administrator to run a scan across the network looking for misconfigured or infected devices.

This is a common enough question, but basically there is a standard set of elements to consider when determining whether or not your furniture is antique.

Many people make the mistake of looking at one or two details while neglecting the rest, but judging antique furniture is a lot like judging a painting: look at the details, but also take in an overall perspective.

For starters, look closely at the hardware—pulls, knobs, hinges, screws, nails, whatever. Keep in mind that hardware goes in and out of style just like everything else, so a large majority of antique furniture has had its hardware replaced at least once.

Look for areas that have been worn down or replaced.