Companys can not stop employees from dating each other

30-Apr-2017 03:03

To learn more about your rights with respect to off-duty conduct, read below: 1. Is there anything I can write about in my blog that I cannot be fired for? I have a second job on weekends, which never interferes with my work for my full-time employer. I smoke medical marijuana in a state where it's legal, however, my employer fired me for testing positive for marijuana. Generally speaking, if there is no law specifically protecting you from being fired for the activity under consideration, and if you are not a union or governmental employee with special protection against being fired without a reason, then you are employed at will.

Can my employer fire me for what I do on my own time, outside of work? My company has announced that it is going to fire anyone who is a smoker, after strictly enforcing an anti-smoking policy at work for several years. I occasionally mention things that happen to me at work, but don't identify who my employer is. My employer's personnel handbook has a "no-moonlighting" policy. My company has a "no fraternization" policy that restricts managers from socializing with non-management employees. Employment-at-will means that both the employer and the employee can end the employment relationship at any time without notice or reason.

A place where people share a common interest, and spend most of their time, provides the perfect opportunity for love.

While love can make one do crazy things An added complication is that one or both partners involved in a workplace romance may be married or in a relationship outside of the workplace.

Quick backstory: We didn't meet on the job — we were dating for almost four years before we started working together (which, by the way, wasn't planned … But for about 11 months, we sat three cubes apart from one another and kept our relationship under wraps. People sometimes act differently at work than they do in their personal life. No need to send a blast email with "the news" of you and your cube-mate's new relationship.

But they happen all the time, and when they do, there are three possible outcomes: The relationship turns sour and your reputation and career take a beating; it ends, but you're both mature and cordial and don't let the breakup affect your work; or A survey by Career Builder last year revealed that nearly 40% of employees admitted to having a romantic relationship with a coworker, and almost one-third of office relationships result in marriage. We are getting married in two months.) It's up to you to figure out whether pursuing an office relationship is worth the possible consequences, good and bad. My situation was unique because we were already a couple before we started working together — but generally that isn't the case, and Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of "Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job," suggests you try being friends in-and-outside the office before you make any moves.

Focus on work and do your job — especially if you want to mitigate gossip.

"No one wants to hear about how deeply you're in love with each other or where you went last weekend or the fight you had in the car this morning," she explains. Again — nobody wants or needs to know about what's happening with your love life.

"What will be your plan 'B' if the heat is on from a supervisor, from gossip, or if things go awry? "Better to overcompensate than to constantly test the limits of workplace etiquette while hoping for the best." Be sensitive and respectful to others.

My answer to all three: "Nope — because we followed the rules." The truth is, office romances are tricky and generally not recommended.

" Those are questions I'm frequently asked when I tell people the story of my office romance.

Along with this, businesses and companies are still confused at whether or not they should interfere in the romantic relationship.

If they do choose to interfere, what department should be in control of handling the situation and what policies should be set if workplace romances do happen.

"What will be your plan 'B' if the heat is on from a supervisor, from gossip, or if things go awry? "Better to overcompensate than to constantly test the limits of workplace etiquette while hoping for the best." Be sensitive and respectful to others. My answer to all three: "Nope — because we followed the rules." The truth is, office romances are tricky and generally not recommended. " Those are questions I'm frequently asked when I tell people the story of my office romance.Along with this, businesses and companies are still confused at whether or not they should interfere in the romantic relationship.If they do choose to interfere, what department should be in control of handling the situation and what policies should be set if workplace romances do happen.Chas Rampenthal is general counsel and vice president of product development at Legal Zoom.